Farewell, my slug

It’s hard to end things, especially when it is going well. It’s a quirk of mine — I have a hard time completing really good books, adding a signature to paintings or finishing fun video games. I mean, I still haven’t finished Baldur’s Gate or Diablo. I enjoy them too much to say goodbye, to let them drop from the “currently enjoying” column into the “been there, done that” category.

This is why I had a bowl of garlic cloves soaking in my kitchen this morning. And let me tell you, when garlic is deciding to root in a bowl of water, the smell is… potent.

It has been a good season in the garden, and I’m having a hard time closing it down for the winter. Sure, it wasn’t perfect. The two tomato plants crowded out 6 cucumber vines, the zucchini, and even the basil. The trellising fell over. There was an issue with aphids delighting in the fennel. The beans were woody, the number of potatoes harvested was the exact amount planted.

But to watch the sprouts come to bear, to simply walk out with a pair of scissors and gather whatever was ready for dinner, the long nasturtium vines, the pill bugs and dragonflies visiting, the two monster spiders that protected the heirloom tomatoes… it’s been a fun ride this year, baby. I don’t wanna let it go.

So when I opened my refrigerator and saw that the cloves of garlic had sprouted, I couldn’t throw them away. You do understand, don’t you?

And when I was chopping up the tomato vines, and found a couple branches still going strong, I couldn’t just turn away.

Today, I planted 80 cloves of garlic in the garden during a downpour. Inside the house, I have a potted onion, a pineapple top (planted in spring), and wastebaskets that have been re-purposed as planters. These “planters” contain chives, the heirloom tomato branch, and the root system of the cherry tomato, with one tiny branch emerging.

I’m planning on some Kale and lettuce for winter planting, and listing the missed varieties that we should add to our garden next year.

I just can’t give it up.

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